Mid Size Power Boats 

A Guide for Discreminating Buyers

Chapter 1

Basic Considerations

The Benefits
Are You a Candidate for a Being Happy Boat Owner?
How Much Time is Involved?
Resale Value
Boat Size vs Cost
The Importance of Proximity
Cost/Time Benefits
Getting Upside Down
Winter Lay Up
Why Boat Repairs Are So Costly
The Risks
Portrait of a Happy Boat Owner
Insurance
The Cost of Boating
Partnerships
Charter Arrangements
The Nature of the Industry
Dealerships
Quality Issues
Warranties
New -vs- Used Boats
What to Expect From a New Boat Purchase

Copyright© 2003 David H. Pascoe


Excerpt: Chapter 1


Most people would agree that it doesn't make much sense to spend tens, even hundreds of thousands of dollars to buy a boat only to find out the hard way that boat ownership and boating is not for you.

Unfortunately, thousands of people every year do just that, only to find that owing a boat was a lot more than they bargained for; that boating was not all fun-in-the-sun and chasing mermaids along palm studded beaches.

Therefore, in this opening chapter we start out by taking a hard look at what boat ownership is all about by examining the benefits, the risks and the liabilities of being a boat owner.

The Benefits

The benefits of boat ownership are pretty obvious, namely that it's yours and you can use it and go whenever and wherever you wish.

It affords not only a recreation for singles and families, but can also serve as an excellent social venue for mixing business and pleasure, or simply pleasure alone. It meets the needs of the socialite and the loner with equal ease.

Another advantage for people who are seriously into boating is the weekend and vacation retreat that can be mobile or stationary, the proverbial floating condo.

But for many, boating becomes an avocation and a way of life, much as others take to golf, tennis or skiing. More than merely a means of waterborne transportation, it's a seagoing abode that is vastly more versatile than a motor home, which is severely limited as to where it can go and park.

With a boat you can go just about anywhere the water is deep and protected enough to throw out an anchor and create your own "RV park" without paying fees and being crammed together with everyone else's undisciplined, screaming kids!

The foregoing barely scratches the possibilities. However, the would-be boat owner should be made aware that with all that freedom comes a rather hefty price. The remainder of this chapter is devoted to discussing those unpublished price tags.

Are You a Candidate for a Being Happy Boat Owner?

This is a subject you are not likely to find in any other book, mainly because, unlike most other writers, I'm not trying to sell you a boat. It concerns me not a bit whether you buy one or not, so if I save you from making a mistake, this book will have fulfilled its purpose.

My job here is to provide you with accurate, honest information, and in that vein I'm going to talk about some of the more serious and unpleasant risks and responsibilities involved in boat ownership.

Buying a large boat is something you want to do with your eyes wide open. Like buying stock for your 401k, if you take advice from people who sell the stuff, you're likely to run into trouble.

There are three main and several secondary reasons why people get into trouble with boats: Ownership usually proves more costly than they expected, it involved more work than anticipated, or it turned out that they didn't have as much time as they thought they'd have to use the boat, or any combination of the three.

Other more marginal, though no less relevant reasons are that some people buy into something they should know that they can't afford, or that other members of the family don't care for (mainly the wife) but the buyer tries to push on them.

A final, and fairly common mistake comes to the person who is determined to buy cheap in a world dictated by the rule that there are no free lunches except from the government. Mercifully, the government doesn't build boats.

It is very easy to get in over one's head financially through not taking the time to add up all the costs, and including a cushion for unanticipated expenses.

Many people make the mistake of buying a new boat with the idea that the warranty and insurance are going to eliminate all maintenance and repair costs. Rest assured, these won't. I explain why further on in this chapter.

Copyright© 2004 David H. Pascoe
(Additional spaces are added for easy screen reading.)
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cover art: Boat two bows Mid Size Power Boats
- A Guide to Discriminating Buyers

by
Soft Cover
512 pages
Publisher: D. H. Pascoe & Co., Inc.
Published: 2003
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0965649636
ISBN-13: 9780965649636

Price: $59.50
In Stock

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David Pascoe - Biography

David Pascoe is a second generation marine surveyor in his family who began his surveying career at age 16 as an apprentice in 1965 as the era of wooden boats was drawing to a close.

Certified by the National Association of Marine Surveyors in 1972, he has conducted over 5,000 pre purchase surveys in addition to having conducted hundreds of boating accident investigations, including fires, sinkings, hull failures and machinery failure analysis.

Over forty years of knowledge and experience are brought to bear in following books. David Pascoe is the author of:

In addition to readers in the United States, boaters and boat industry professionals worldwide from over 70 countries have purchased David Pascoe's books, since introduction of his first book in 2001.

In 2012, David Pascoe has retired from marine surveying business at age 65.

Biography - Long version


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